Childhood cinephilia, object relations, and videographic film studies
Catherine Grant, Christian Keathley
Truth, Fiction, and Ken Russell’s Early Television Documentaries
Christophe Van Eecke
Deleuze’s Character of the Forger in the Film L’humanité
Pieter-Jan Decoster, Nancy Vansieleghem

Issue 1: Just the Facts – A New Realist Cinema?

23 November 2013
Tom Paulus
25 November 2013
Michael Guarneri
25 November 2013
Christophe Van Eecke
26 November 2013
Tom Paulus
27 November 2013
Drehli Robnik
27 November 2013
David Gunzburg
27 November 2013
Pieter-Jan Decoster, Nancy Vansieleghem
27 November 2013
Stefaan Decostere

Moments

The cinephiliac moment is not grand or dramatic, nor carefully designed and choreographed to be memorable, but rather marginal or accidental, a moment that is remembered almost in spite of itself. A fleeting moment that triggers an affective, emotional intensity, which embodies each cinephile's obsessive relationship with cinema.

from A Bill of Divorcement (George Cukor, 1932)

from La Ricotta (Pier Paolo Pasolini - from Ro.Go.Pa.G., 1963)

"The End. The main character, also a kind of clown, is an extra in a movie about the life of Christ. He is supposed to hang on a cross next to Jesus. During the whole shoot he had to wait, and now, finally, they are going to shoot his scene. Everybody is watching: the producers, the director, a bunch of journalists and the crew. For the first time, there is silence. They rehearse his only phrase once more: “Lord, remember me when thou comest in thy kingdom.”

from I Clowns (Federico Fellini, 1970)

"A man sneaks out of the hospital to see an act of two famous clowns in the circus. We watch him, watching the circus, he laughs, and applauds, he sweats but looks happy like a child. It is an honest joy of somebody who is one with an act he is experiencing.

from Le salaire de la peur (Henri-Georges Clouzot, 1953)

from The Lusty Men (Nicholas Ray, 1952) and 55 Days at Peking (Nicholas Ray, 1963) and Bigger than Life (Nicholas Ray, 1956)